Lapidus–OI Fellowship for Graduate Research in Early American Print Culture

The Omohundro Institute offers up to eight $1,000 fellowships annually to support advanced graduate student research related to early American and transatlantic print culture.

  • Up to four $1,000 fellowships are awarded to support advanced graduate student research related to Slavery and Print Culture in the early American and transatlantic world.
  • Up to four $1,000 fellowships are awarded to support advanced graduate student research related to early American and transatlantic print culture, including authorship, production, circulation, and reception.

Applicants for each topic area should be prepared to submit an electronic file with a 500-word description of their dissertation project, a c.v., and a one-paragraph research agenda for the calendar year.

Applications are due November 1.

Both of these fellowships are made possible through the generous support of Sid Lapidus and are prompted by his interest in investigating the anonymous authorship of the 1808 letter to Thomas Jefferson from “a Slave,” discussed by Thomas N. Baker in the January 2011 issue of the William and Mary Quarterly.

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