Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

Leading Early American Scholarship Since 1943


William and Mary Quarterly

Richard L. Morton Award. 1986–2016

First established in 1986, the award honors Richard L. Morton, founding editor of the journal’s Third Series, respected teacher for forty years at the College of William and Mary, and an important colonial American historian. The annual prize is a selection of books from the Institute’s list.

Year of Award Article Issue
2016 Keith Pluymers, “Atlantic Iron: Wood Scarcity and the Political Ecology of Early English Expansion” July
2015 Nicholas Radburn, “Guinea Factors, Slave Sales and the Profits of the Transatlantic Slave Trade in Late Eighteenth-Century Jamaica: The Case of John Tailyour” October
2014 Christopher Steinke, “Here is my country”: Too Né’s Map of Lewis and Clark in the Great Plains October
2013 Cameron Strang, “Indian Storytelling, Scientific Knowledge, and Power in the Florida Borderland” October
2012 Glenda Goodman, “‘But they differ from us in sound’: Indian Psalmody and the Soundscape of Colonialism, 1651–75” October
2011 Randy M. Browne, “The ‘Bad Business’ of Obeah: Power, Authority, and the Politics of Slave Culture in the British Caribbean” July
2009 Nathan R. Perl-Rosenthal, “‘The ‘divine right of republics’: Hebraic Republicanism and the Debate over Kingless Government in Revolutionary America” July
2008 Brian Phillips Murphy, “‘A very convenient instrument’: The Manhattan Company, Aaron Burr, and the Election of 1800” April
2007 William A. Pettigrew, “Free to Enslave: Politics and the Escalation of Britain's Transatlantic Slave Trade, 1688–1714” January
2006 Heidi Bohaker, “Nindoodemag: The Significance of Algonquian Kinship Networks in the Eastern Great Lakes Region, 1600–1701” January
2005 Susan Kern, “The Material World of the Jeffersons at Shadwell” April
2004 Margot Minardi, “The Boston Inoculation Controversy of 1721–1722: An Incident in the History of Race” January
2003 Brett Rushforth, “‘A Little Flesh We Offer You’: The Origins of Indian Slavery in New France” October
2002 Robert E. Desrochers, Jr., “Slave For Sale Advertisements and Slavery in Massachusetts, 1704–1781” July
2001 Sara Stidstone Gronim, “Geography and Persuasion: Maps in British Colonial New York” April
2000 None  
1999 Thomas A. Foster, “Deficient Husbands: Manhood, Sexual Incapacity, and Male Marital Sexuality in Seventeenth-Century New England” October
1998 Douglas L. Winiarski, “‘Pale Blewish Lights’ and a Dead Man’s Groan: Tales of the Supernatural from Eighteenth-Century Plymouth, Massachusetts” October
1997 Susan Scott Parrish, “The Female Opossum and the Nature of the New World” July
1996 Jenny Hale Pulsipher, “Massacre at Hurtleberry Hill: Christian Indians and English Authority in Metacom’s War” July
1995 Evan Haefeli (co–author with Kevin Sweeney), “Revisiting The Redeemed Captive: New Perspectives on the 1704 Attack on Deerfield” January
1994 None  
1993 Richard Cullen Rath, “African Music in Seventeenth-Century Jamaica: Cultural Transit and Transmission” October
1992 None  
1991 Thomas N. Ingersoll, “Free Blacks in a Slave Society: New Orleans, 1718–1812” April
1990 J. David Lehman, “The End of the Iroqouis Mystique: The Oneida Land Cession Treaties of the 1780s” October
1989 Stephen R. Grossbart, “Seeking the Divine Favor: Conversion and Church Admission in Eastern Connecticut, 1711–1832” October
1988 None  
1987 Lisa Wilson Waciega, “A ‘Man of Business’: The Widow of Means in Southeastern Pennsylvania, 1750–1850” January
1986 Leigh Eric Schmidt, “‘A Second and Glorious Reformation’: The New Light Extremism of Andrew Croswell” April