Territorial Crossings

OIEAHCEMSI Logo
A William and Mary Quarterly &
USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute Workshop

Territorial Crossings: Histories and Historiographies of the Early Americas

Program

May 21, 2009

Overseers’ Room, the Huntington Library

9:00–9:30 Coffee

9:30–10:00 Welcome and Introduction

Welcome: Peter Mancall, Early Modern Studies Institute, and Scott Casper, William and Mary Quarterly

Conveners’ Introduction: Eric Hinderaker, University of Utah, and Rebecca Horn, University of Utah

10:00–11:00 Session 1

Chair: Peter Mancall, Early Modern Studies Institute

Jorge Canizares-Esguerra, University of Texas, Austin
James Sidbury, University of Texas, Austin

Mapping Ethnogenesis in the Early Modern Atlantic

Ann Little, Colorado State University • Respondent

11:00–12:00 P.M. Session 2

Chair: Peter Mancall, Early Modern Studies Institute

Juliana Barr, University of Florida
The Problem of Borderlands in Early America

Allan Greer, University of Toronto • Respondent

12:00–1:30 • Lunch

1:30–2:30 Session 3

Chair: Scott Casper, William and Mary Quarterly

Paul Mapp, College of William and Mary
Interpretive Implications of a Continental Approach

Carla Gerona, Georgia Institute of Technology • Respondent

2:30–3:00 Coffee

3:00–4:00 Session 4

Chair: Scott Casper, William and Mary Quarterly

Peter Silver, Rutgers University
A Rotten Colossus: The Americas in the War of Jenkins’s Ear

Daniel Usner, Vanderbilt University • Respondent

May 22, 2009

Overseers’ Room, the Huntington Library

9:30–10:00 Coffee

10:00–11:00 Session 5

Chair: Steven Hackel, University of California, Riverside

Daniel Usner, Vanderbilt University
Rescuing Early America from National Narratives: A New Comparative Approach to New France and the Lower Mississippi Valley

Jorge Canizares-Esguerra, University of Texas, Austin
James Sidbury, University of Texas, Austin
• Respondents

11:00 A.M.–12:00 P.M. Session 6

Chair: Steven Hackel, University of California, Riverside

Carla Gerona, Georgia Institute of Technology
More than Six Flags: An Ethnohistory of an Early Texas Place from the Caddos to the Texians

Peter Silver, Rutgers University • Respondent

12:00–1:30 Lunch

1:30–2:30 Session 7

Chair: Karin Wulf, William and Mary Quarterly

Ann Little, Colorado State University
Esther Wheelwright: A Life Across Borders

Paul Mapp, College of William and Mary • Respondent

2:30–3:30 Session 8

Chair: Karin Wulf, William and Mary Quarterly

Allan Greer, University of Toronto
Perspectives on New France

Juliana Barr, University of Florida • Respondent

3:30–4:00 Coffee

4:00–5:00 Final Discussion

Eric Hinderaker, University of Utah & Rebecca Horn, University of Utah

Art: Segesser II (right side detail), 1720–1729? Courtesy Palace of the Governors Photo Archives (NMHM/DCA), detail from negative no. 149804. One of a pair, this large painting on tanned bison hide depicts an Aug. 13, 1720, skirmish at the confluence of the Loup and Platte rivers, between Pedro de Villasur’s expedition of Spanish and Pueblo Indian soldiers and a force of Pawnee and Oto Indians aided by some Frenchmen. Though it is unclear from the historical record whether any French were actually present, Villasur’s mission was to investigate rumors of French encroachment on Spanish-claimed territory. Jesuit priest Philipp von Segesser von Brunegg probably acquired the paintings in Sonora, Mexico, between 1732 and 1758, but many scholars believe they were created by indigenous artists. Segesser sent the paintings to his family in Switzerland, where they remained for 200 years.