Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

Leading Early American Scholarship Since 1943


19th Annual Conference

June 13–15, 2013 • Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland

Hosted by the Johns Hopkins University, with the support of the Department of History, the Department of English, and the Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, Krieger School

Introduction

The Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture was founded as the Institute of Early American History and Culture in 1943 by the College of William and Mary and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation to “foster study, research, and publications bearing on American history approximately to the year 1815.” Still jointly sponsored by the College and Colonial Williamsburg, the Institute was renamed in 1996, in recognition of a generous endowment from the late Mr. and Mrs. Malvern H. Omohundro, Jr. The Institute publishes the William and Mary Quarterly, books in its field of interest, and a e-newsletter; organizes and supports a variety of conferences, seminars, and colloquia; and annually offers a two-year postdoctoral fellowship.

In June 1995, the Institute inaugurated a series of annual conferences specifically designed to serve as a forum for the rich variety of work under way in the early American field. Organized exclusively by calls for papers and panels and held in a different geographic region each year, these meetings are intended to bring together and facilitate exchanges among junior and senior scholars from several disciplines who share a common interest in the history and culture of early America. Philip D. Morgan (Johns Hopkins University) chaired the program committee for the 2013 conference. Members of the committee included Toby Ditz (Johns Hopkins University), Alison Games (Georgetown University), Kate Haulman (American University), Jared Hickman (Johns Hopkins University), Marjoleine Kars (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Matthew Mulcahy (Loyola University Maryland), Larry Peskin (Morgan State University), and David Silverman (George Washington University). The organizers thank Johns Hopkins University for its hospitality and the Department of History, the Department of English, and the Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences, Krieger School, Johns Hopkins University, for financial support. Special gratitude goes to Molly Warsh (University of Pittsburgh) and Stephanie Gamble (Johns Hopkins University) for their superb assistance with the conference.