Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

Leading Early American Scholarship Since 1943


Books

Unless otherwise indicated, all OI books are distributed by The University of North Carolina Press.


Children of Coyote, Missionaries of St. Francis

Indian-Spanish Relations in Colonial California, 1769–1850

Steven Hackel

Cloth: 978-0-8078-2988-2 ($77.95)
Paper: ($28.95)

Copyright 2005
University of North Carolina Press

A Prize-Winning Book

  • James Broussard Best First Book Prize, Society for Historians of the Early American Republic (2006)
  • Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin Book Award, American Society for Ethnohistory (2006)
  • Hubert Herring Book Award, Pacific Coast Council on Latin American Studies (2006)
  • Norman Neuerburg Award, Historical Society of Southern California (2006)
  • W. Turrentine Jackson Award, Western History Association (2007)

Description



Reviews

An exciting new view of Indian neophytes and material changes in the California missions. . . . Hackel delves into the complexities and ironies of oppression in colonial California: how Indians found room for themselves and their ways within the missions, even as they became lethal homes. . . . Quite an achievement.

--William B. Taylor


Steven Hackel reminds us that the colonial history of North America did not begin in 1607 or end in 1776, nor was it limited to the Atlantic seaboard. This richly detailed study addresses major themes in the American experience, including religion, historical demography, and sexuality, and forcefully inserts the history of Spanish colonial America into the larger historical world of early America.

--Sylvia Frey


An excellent book on Indian-white relations, looking specifically at mission life, the development of Indian political authorities, the organization of work, conflicts between the Franciscans and royal officials over Indian life and labor, and ultimately the secularization of the California missions. Clearly Hackel has done massive archival research, and the rich and dense results are evident on every page.

--Ramon A. Gutierrez


Steve Hackel's Children of Coyote, Missionaries of Saint Francis surpasses expectation. . . . Lucidly written and extensively researched. . . . The book's length may be demanding, but it is rewarding for its depth of research.

--Western Historical Quarterly


Like all good histories, this book opens new possibilities for future scholarship. Hackel's lasting achievement and service is to provide a thoroughgoing reference point for students of California missionization and the colonial history of the Americas.

--The Journal of San Diego History


The complicated story that Hackel tells is an important contribution to Native American history in the colonial period. . . . Children of Coyote is the most comprehensive and important study of mission Indians to date. It should be a model for students of the California missions for many years to come. More than that, he raises important questions about the nature of colonial conquest and what it meant to be conquered and conqueror alike.

--Southern California Quarterly


[Hackel's] extensive research . . . provide[s] insights far beyond one community.

--Journal of the Early Republic


Hackel's lively book is filled with copious details and engaging statistics. . . . Fascinating.

--Catholic Historical Review


A significant reinterpretation of North American colonial history. . . . [Hackel's] findings . . . are poignant.

--Muse


This detailed social history emerges out of Hackel's extraordinary command of colonial primary source materials. The pages of the book brim with individual accounts of personal tragedy and careful negotiation within the hierarchies of Mission San Carlos. . . . Like all good histories, this book opens new possibilities for future scholarship. [A] lasting achievement.

--Journal of San Diego History


A rich and rewarding contribution to the scholarship on missions of colonial California. . . . [Hackel's] study is a tour de force of methods and research.

--Journal of American History


Hackel's knowledge of the geography of California, the tribal cultures of the area, and the historical background, is thorough. The research depth he demonstrates in writing this history make his book a useable source of information as well as a readable history for the general reader.

--Colonial Latin American Historical Review


Hackel's impressive research, clear prose, broad contextualization, and effective organization make this book the most comprehensive and satisfying study of Alta California to date and a hard act to follow.

--William and Mary Quarterly


The complicated story that Hackel tells is an important contribution to Native American history in the colonial period. . . . Children of Coyote is the most comprehensive and important study of mission Indians to date. It should be a model for students of the California missions for many years to come.

--Southern California Quarterly