Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

Leading Early American Scholarship Since 1943


Books

Unless otherwise indicated, all OI books are distributed by The University of North Carolina Press.


Empire’s Nature

Mark Catesby’s New World Vision

Amy R. W. Meyers and Margaret Pritchard


Paper: 978-0-8078-4762-6 ($39.95)

Copyright 1999
University of North Carolina Press

Description



Reviews

Empire’s Nature is a wonderful book, a meticulous tracing of Catesby’s sumptuous welding of botany and zoology into eighteenth-century natural history and into timeless visual art.

--John R. Stilgoe


A richly rewarding volume for readers interested in the history of science, art, and political culture of the circum-Atlantic world.

--K. Dian Kriz


Empire’s Nature informs us of the specifics of Catesby’s achievement to illuminate the larger eighteenth-century scientific and imperial cultural context.

--Jules David Prown


A thoughtful and sometimes provocative reexamination of Mark Catesby's roles in British natural history during the early eighteenth century. In contrast to most previous work on Catesby, which has focused primarily on his activities as an illustrator of plants and animals, the Meyers volume explores Catesby's life and work in the much broader perspective of the social, political, economic, cultural, and scientific milieu of his time.

--North Carolina Historical Review


A handsomely illustrated collection of essays . . . [that] admirably reassesses Catesby's importance to the recording of natural history.

--Virginia Magazine of History and Biography


Empire’s Nature simultaneously provides a compendium of primary data, a rich sampling of current methodological approaches, and provocative ideas that push the envelope of historical interpretation. . . . This book will find an important place in any library.

--William and Mary Quarterly


A useful addition to libraries of readers with a particular interest in the history of colonial or eighteenth-century British science or art.

--Journal of Southern History