Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture

Leading Early American Scholarship Since 1943


Images

We are very grateful to the following organizations for letting us reproduce these images from their collections. Of course, the images we have chosen are just a small sample of the many rich and varied depictions of the Early American world made by the artists and observers of that time.

We welcome your suggestions for additional images from the early American period, broadly interpreted, that would be of special interest to users of this site. If you have suggestions for images that can be used without cost (such as those from the Library of Congress and British Museum sites), then please email Martha Howard at Martha.Howard@wm.edu.

  • On the home page:
  • La Virgenia Pars Courtesy of the British Museum

    “La Virgenia Pars; map of the east coast of North America from the Chesapeake bay to the Florida Keys, with arms of Sir Walter Raleigh, English vessels, dolphins, fish, whales and sea-monsters,” by John White, 1585–1593. Courtesy of the British Museum.

  • Cattle being herded along a dykeland road, courtesy of the Nova Scotia Archives and Records Management

    Detail(s),“Cattle being herded along a dykeland road,” by F. R. Schell. This image was published in G.M. Grant’s Picturesque Canada, Vol. 2, Toronto, 1882. Courtesy of the Nova Scotia Archives & Records Management.

  • On the About pages:
  • Finish'd Horses, Courtesy of CWF

    Finish’d Horses. Matchem and Tray in Running at New-Market, by W. Elliott and T. Smith. Print. (London, 1758) Courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

  • On the Events pages:
  • A Grand Jamaica Ball, Courtesy of Library of Congress

    A Grand Jamaica Ball! Or the Creolean hop a la muftee; as exhibited in Spanish Town, published by William Holland. (London, 1802). Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

  • New England Primer, Courtesy of the American Antiquarian Society

    Detail, New England Primer, 1774. Courtesy, American Antiquarian Society.

  • On the Publications pages:
  • Virginia–North Carolina Dividing Line, Courtesy Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

    Detail, The Virginia–North Carolina Dividing Line. Engraving, modern print from the original copperplate. Rawlinson Collection, Bodleian Library, accession #R1986-9. The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Gift of the Bodleian Library.

  • On the WMQ pages:
  • Reconstructed view of banqueting house at Corotoman, appeared WMQ, October 2013

    Detail, Reconstructed view of banqueting house at Corotoman, 1726–27, Lancaster County, Virginia, looking northeast. Drawing by Roger Guernsey, architect, after Cary Carson. Originally published in the William and Mary Quarterly, October 2013.

  • On the Uncommon Sense pages:
  • Festive Dance, Courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum

    Detail, Festive Dance, drawn by John White between 1585–1593. Later engraved by De Bry in ‘America’ Pt I, pl. XVIII, with following caption: ‘Their danses which they use att their hyghe feastes’. Courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum.

  • On the Fellowship pages:
  • Map of British and French dominions in North America, Courtesy of the Library of Congress

    A map of the British and French dominions in North America, with the roads, distances, limits, and extent of the settlements, humbly inscribed to the Right Honourable the Earl of Halifax, and the other Right Honourable the Lords Commissioners for Trade & Plantations, by their Lordships most obliged and very humble servant, Jno. Mitchell. Tho: Kitchin, sculp. London. Printed for Jefferys and Faden, geographers to the King [1774]. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

  • On the Lapidus Initiative pages:
  • Courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

    Nova Totius Americae Tabula by Pieter Schenk, ca. 1680, Amsterdam. Black and white engraving with period hand color on laid paper. Courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.

  • On the Support pages:
  • Tasting, Courtesy of CWF

    Detail, Tasting, after work by John Nixon. (London, 1784). Courtesy of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation.